Tesla Network goes public. Sort of.

Hello, everyone. Apologies for no articles for these past 2 weeks as we were on vacation. Now, we are back to bring you the freshest and latest news once again. So let’s dive right into in.

As we all know, Tesla is a very exclusive company. All their vehicles have features that are never shared with any other consumer car on the market and the Tesla strategy for producing vehicles, selling them and distributing them is also exclusive to what we normally see with other automakers. Along with this exclusiveness comes their special charging techniques. All Tesla vehicles produced are capable of high speed charging for their superchargers. This is only possible because of the hardware that allows for additional cooling to the battery and a charger that can facilitate the transfer of electricity at such a high voltage. But, the Tesla Network of charging which includes both superchargers and destination chargers are available only to Teslas. This is because Tesla uses a 3 hole inlet for charging over the traditional 5 hole inlet.

 

         

 

Currently, Tesla’s charge port is designed as seen in the top left image. This was not always the case. In the right image, we see the charge port that is used in most electric vehicles today such as the Chevy Bolt and the Nissan Leaf. This concept was originally used for the Tesla charge port until they began to unveil the superchargers but many Teslas across Europe can still be seen with this. This is because Europe is trying to bring more and more electric vehicles to its continent and have thousands of free charging locations everywhere. Thus, the use of this charger allows Tesla to use these public chargers also. But, in the case that a Tesla still uses a 3 hole inlet, one can use the adapter as shown in the bottom left image. The adapter attaches to your charge port and as we see it takes in a 5 hole inlet. Thus, people who own a Tesla have access to both their own exclusive network and the public one shared with others but not the other way around for other electric vehicles. But that has changed.

Last week, a new electric vehicle adapter came out know as the JDapter Stub. This adapter allows vehicles that are not Tesla’s to access the Destination Charging network but not the Supercharging Network. For those who do not know, the Destination Chargers are essentially what you would find at someone’s home. These chargers that only charge at about 34 miles per hour and are placed at hotels, motels and rest stops allowing a Tesla owner to charge their vehicle overnight. With this new adapter, over 4,000 chargers around the world have now been opened up to every single electric vehicle that has been commercially produced. The only feature that the non-Tesla’s will not be getting is the full charging speed. The JDapter Stub can only support a maximum of 40 amps but the Destination chargers give an output of 48 amps to Teslas with a charging speed of about 34 miles per hour. At 40 amps, one can get a charging speed of around 27 miles per hour which isn’t that much of a downgrade also considering that most vehicles do not have as much of a range compared to Teslas.

With this new adapter, over 9,000 chargers around the world have now been opened up to every single electric vehicle that has been commercially produced. The only feature that the non-Tesla’s will not be getting is the full charging speed. The J1772 adapter can only support a maximum of 40 amps but the Destination chargers give an output of 48 amps to Teslas with a charging speed of about 34 miles per hour. At 40 amps, one can get a charging speed of around 27 miles per hour which isn’t that much of a downgrade also considering that most vehicles do not have as much of a range compared to Teslas.

Last week there was also news that CTO of Tesla, JB Straubel, claims that Tesla is “actively talking to other car makers” and want to “figure out a structure to work” with the automaker’s vehicles ” for things like Supercharger[s]”. This is a possible idea but also one that is very complicated. First, all the vehicles would need to have the high speed charging hardware implemented into them. Tesla is also big on software and the connection between a Supercharger and a Tesla is completely software driven. When a Tesla plug’s into a Supercharger Stall, the car sends an encrypted key to the charger, one unique per vehicle. This key allows the vehicle to start charging and also contains all of the vehicle’s information which is then sent to Tesla and stored on their servers. Another big issue is the crowds. With Tesla’s only, the crowds at Supercharger’s are immeasurable. At peak times, there could be 5-7 vehicles waiting in line and being at the back of it could mean a 45 minute wait. All things considered, it would be extremely unlikely that Tesla’s Supercharger Network would go public anytime soon.

 

 

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